Join the Team!
Become a member of QGEM

Be a Part of QGEM and Synbio!

Do you want to be a part of the challenging, stimulating, and rewarding research experience of a lifetime? Are you interested in attending an international jamboree to witness innovation at its finest from universities all around the world? Do you aspire to engineer an organism that will "drop the hottest drug of 2k16"? If so, you're in luck! Each year, QGEM looks for dedicated and driven students who have a passion for research and innovation and wish to join the summer team or simply learn more about synthetic biology. Students from all faculties and areas of study are welcome! Visit this page often or follow us on Facebook/Twitter to learn about upcoming opportunites throughout the term such as guest speakers and public seminars.

Check back during the 2016-2017 academic school year to learn about joining the 2017 QGEM Team!

Upcoming Events/Opportunities:


QGEM Research Seminar

Want to learn more about our summer 2016 project? The Queen's Genetically Engineered Machine Team will be holding a research seminar on September 28th from 5:30 to 7:00 pm to present an overview of our proposed idea for synthesizing novel therapeutics using biological systems! Synthetic biology, its prospective role in the pharmaceutical industry, and what QGEM is doing to help revolutionize drug synthesis are just some of the topics that will be covered! Invite your collegues and friends to come learn more about what we've been up to! Check out the Facebook event here.



iGEM 2016 Giant Jamboree

The Giant Jamboree is an annual event that showcases work from the iGEM season. All iGEM teams are invited to present their synthetic biology projects and compete for prizes. This year the Jamboree will host more than 300 international, multidisciplinary teams who are eager to share and celebrate their work. The event takes place at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston, MA. The main program is the 2016 iGEM Competition, the premiere student team competition in synthetic biology. More info here.